belle bissett

fleurdulys:

Tulip Fields - Vincent van Gogh
1884

fleurdulys:

Tulip Fields - Vincent van Gogh

1884

(via pensivefrangipani)



Don’t speak to me. I want to be with you.


— Antonio Porchia
from “Voices”. Translated from the Spanish by Gonzalo Melchor. Note: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poemcomment/243620

art-and-fury:

Apple Tree I - Gustav Klimt

(previous)

Anne Carson – “The Gender of Sound” (excerpt)

Madness and witchery as well as bestiality are conditions commonly associated with the use of the female voice in public, in ancient as well as modern contexts. Consider how many female celebrities of classical mythology, literature and cult make themselves objectionable by the way they use their voice.

For example, there is the heart-chilling groan of the Gorgon, whose name is derived from a Sanskrit word, *garg meaning “a guttural animal howl that issues as a great wind from the back of the throat through a hugely distended mouth”. There are the Furies whose high-pitched and horrendous voices are compared by Aiskhylos to howling dogs or sounds of people being tortured in hell (Eumenides). There is the deadly voice of the Sirens and the dangerous ventriloquism of Helen (Odyssey) and the incredible babbling of Kassandra (Aiskhylos, Agamemnon) and the fearsome hullabaloo of Artemis as she charges through the woods (Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite). There is the seductive discourse of Aphrodite which is so concrete an aspect of her power that she can wear it on her belt as a physical object or lend it to other women (Iliad). There is the old woman of Eleusinian legend Iambe who shrieks obscenities and throws her skirt up over her head to expose her genitalia. There is the haunting garrulity of the nymph Echo (daughter of Iambe in Athenian legend) who is described by Sophokles as “the girl with no door on her mouth” (Philoktetes).

Putting a door on the female mouth has been an important project of patriarchal culture from antiquity to the present day. Its chief tactic is an ideological association of female sound with monstrosity, disorder and death.

– From “The Gender of Sound”, in Glass, Irony and God. New Directions, 1995: pp 120-121
The essay: http://soundspill.org/ongoing/Carson.pdf

Art: Cassandra by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Pablo Picasso • A glass, 1911

Pablo Picasso • A glass, 1911

stpaulslifestyle:

GILBERT & GEORGE – LAST MONTH.
 

Gilbert & George – Scapegoating Pictures for London. White Cube, Bermondsey. Ten out of ten.
‘Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth’
Oscar Wilde (1891)
Here.

stpaulslifestyle:

GILBERT & GEORGE – LAST MONTH.

Gilbert & George – Scapegoating Pictures for London. White Cube, Bermondsey. Ten out of ten.

Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth’

Oscar Wilde (1891)

Here.

contemporaryarabart:

Mohannad Orabi, Profile Portrait (2012)
80x60 cm, mixed media on paper

contemporaryarabart:

Mohannad OrabiProfile Portrait (2012)

80x60 cm, mixed media on paper

(via jetude)

jetude:

.lace, curve, line

jetude:

.lace, curve, line

cicadas and katydids and brown eyed susans – late summer at the lake

cicadas and katydids and brown eyed susans – late summer at the lake

Cause, Principle, and Unity (1584) “Of Love” – Giordano Bruno

Cause, Principle, and One eternal
From whom being, life, and movement are suspended,
And which extends itself in length, breadth, and depth,
To whatever is in Heaven, on Earth, and Hell;
With sense, with reason, with mind, I discern,
That there is no act, measure, nor calculation, which can comprehend
That force, that vastness and that number,
Which exceeds whatever is inferior, middle, and highest;
Blind error, avaricious time, adverse fortune,
Deaf envy, vile madness, jealous iniquity,
Crude heart, perverse spirit, insane audacity,
Will not be sufficient to obscure the air for me,
Will not place the veil before my eyes,
Will never bring it about that I shall not
Contemplate my beautiful Sun.

— Giordano Bruno

"Of Love" (dedicatory poem) as translated in The Infinite in Giordano Bruno : With a Translation of His Dialogue, Concerning the Cause, Principle, and One (1978) by Sidney Thomas Greenburg, p. 89

Biography: http://www.egs.edu/library/giordano-bruno/biography/
More: http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/ciencia_giordano03.htm

Yasuo Kuniyoshi
born Okayama, Japan 1889–died New York City 1953

Fakirs, 1951
More: http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/online/roby/art/1986.6.93.cfm

Yasuo Kuniyoshi
born Okayama, Japan 1889–died New York City 1953

Fakirs, 1951
More: http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/online/roby/art/1986.6.93.cfm

James A. Garfield, Chief of Apaches

1900, John K. Rose, born Ayr, Ontario, Canada 1849 - 1932

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Source: http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/online/photographs/exhibit/american_characters/artwork/2008.36.2

James A. Garfield, Chief of Apaches

1900, John K. Rose, born Ayr, Ontario, Canada 1849 - 1932

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Source: http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/online/photographs/exhibit/american_characters/artwork/2008.36.2

A trip to the museum last weekend, here are a few of my favorites :)
Minneapolis Institute of Arts #mia http://t.co/F3FJkwpyS7

1. Pierre-Joseph Redouté • Amaryllis lutea, c. 1800-1806.
2. Gustav Klimt • Male Figure w/ Outstretched Arms, Study for the Beethoven Frieze, 1902
3. Amedeo Modigliani • Female Bust in Red, 1915
4. Egon Schiele • Standing Girl, 1910

"I am nothing but words,
       just a shape
              of dreams or night."

Euripides, Herakles, translated by Anne Carson in Grief Lessons (NYRB Classics, 2006)

(Source: proustitute, via apoetreflects)

iamjapanese:

HOSOKIBARA Seiki( 細木原青起 Japanese, 1885-1958)
Wind Blowing from Mt. Fuji
ink, color, and azurite on silk

iamjapanese:

HOSOKIBARA Seiki( 細木原青起 Japanese, 1885-1958)

Wind Blowing from Mt. Fuji

ink, color, and azurite on silk

(via alienlandings)